Syracuse with the remaining vestiges of its Five Cities by S.D.U.K. (Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge )

Syracuse with the remaining vestiges of its Five Cities by S.D.U.K. (Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge )

Code: 49039

£40.00 Approx $51.75, €46.46
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Author: S.D.U.K. (Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge )

Publisher: The University Atlas of Classical and Modern Geography. Stanford

Date published: 1874

Fine steel engraving with original outline hand colouring and the blue wash at the borders peculiar to this edition... Overall size (unmounted) : 43.1cms x 36cms. Image size : 392mm x 330mm. Panoramic view of Syracuse from the Theatre along lower border. Centre fold as issued with minute archival strengthening at top and bottom on verso else very good condition. Benevolent societies whose intentions were to disseminate knowledge were a distinguishing feature of the Victorian age. This society was founded in 1827 by John, Earl Russell and Henry Brougham, later Lord Chancellor of England. Earl Russell was an M.P. who was responsible for setting up an inspectorate for schools and an additional grant of £30, 000 for education. The society published books that were deemed to be of high educational worth but produced them at a price that was affordable. Their greatest publication, most probably, was their atlas of the world entitled 'Maps of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge'.The town and city plans in this series are particularly prized now - these fine steel engravings have original hand colouring and are often embellished with vignettes and comparisons of the heights of the principal buildings of the city. Benevolent societies whose intentions were to disseminate knowledge were a distinguishing feature of the Victorian age. This society was founded in 1827 by John, Earl Russell and Henry Brougham, later Lord Chancellor of England. Earl Russell was an M.P. who was responsible for setting up an inspectorate for schools and an additional grant of £30, 000 for education. The society published books that were deemed to be of high educational worth but produced them at a price that was affordable. Their greatest publication, most probably, was their atlas of the world entitled 'Maps of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge'.The town and city plans in this series are particularly prized now - these fine steel engravings have original hand colouring and are often embellished with vignettes and comparisons of the heights of the principal buildings of the city.